Wednesday, May 28, 2014

The Test........TMI*

known as transesophageal echocardiogram, known as TEE.

6:00am    alarm rings. I slap my hand on the snooze-alarm and turn over, burrowing even more deeply into the warm and toasty covers; fully knowing I couldn't stay there, no matter how little sleep I'd had. Aware that my usual 2 cups of black coffee were denied to me made it harder than ever to arise. But I did. A quick check of the weather showed afternoon temperatures of 90+. I brushed my teeth as well as you can without paste and only enough water to wet the brush. 

6:15am    The hot shower awaits, and I step into it, wishing I could luxuriate there for much longer. The objective is simply to get clean enough to present my body to the inevitable nurses and doctors who would be present. Mission accomplished, I dressed in the most comfortable, easiest to remove clothing in my closet  (and no bra), since we were coming straight home afterward. 

7:00am    I check Facebook, where I find a myriad of well wishes and promised prayers. I feel loved and appreciated, and oddly serene. Daughter Two arrives, with breakfast for her Dad, ready to drive me to the hospital. Morning traffic is a horror story. I am long past the days when I had any reason to be out in the early morning, and for that, I am grateful. 

8:00am  We arrive at the hospital, and with a minimum of information-exchanges, I am taken back to the testing area. It is so shiny clean that I can almost see my self in the floors. The room assigned to me is amply-sized and filled with technical equipment and cabinets holding Lord knows what (though I am not curious.) I lie on the bed and there is another exchange of information  (as always happens in hospitals, I am finding. Every time you turn around you are telling someone your birthday and other pertinent information, and it is important!) Eventually, I am fitted with BP cuff and pulse clip, oxygen and IV sticks. 

9:00am  I am given instructions about what will happen during the test; beginning with an attempt to gargle something that is the consistency of slimy pudding (but doesn't taste anywhere near as good.)  Its purpose is to numb my throat. When the nurse poured it into my mouth, it "glopped" under my tongue and I had a devil of a time getting it over my tongue and into my throat area so that I was able to gargle it. BTW: 'glopped' IS a word....I made it up.  After the gargle attempt, I swallowed it and then the nurse sprayed my throat four times with another anesthetic. It did not take long for the sensation of numbness to visit my mouth and throat. I don't care for it.....LOL. Losing the feeling in any part of my body is not my cup of tea. 

9:30am  The doctor arrived, and the nurse put the required amount of anesthesia into the IV line. I think it took about 5 seconds to put me under.  They had told me I wouldn't remember "swallowing" the tubing with a camera on the end, and I didn't, for which I am eternally grateful!
I became aware of what the doctor was saying at some point, before the tubing was removed, but it didn't hurt - it was just an odd sensation in my chest. Next thing I knew, they were calling my name and I slowly came back to consciousness, none the worse for the wear. 

The doctor was called away on an emergency, so I didn't get a full report. She wanted to view the video again before she tells her findings, but her general idea is that the results corroborate the findings in the cardiac cath that I had last month. That is good news, indeed. I will make an appointment tomorrow to see the doc again in a week or so. 

Thanks to all of you who wished me well, and I hope that if any of you ever have to have this test, reading this will help allay any fears you may have. It was truly "a piece of cake!"

TMI*  is of course, too much information. I am guilty of it, always. 



12 comments:

tiff said...

Good to know that you were well taken care of. Stuff like this can be very scary if you're uninformed.

Miss Dazey said...

Oh my... Glad that is over.

Redondowriter said...

You wrote very succinctly so the anesthesia IV must not have put you too deep. Here's hoping for good outcome.

Ginnie said...

Sounds like the two EGDs that I had last year except that they did the throat numbing after I was out. I hope that the findings will be negative. Thanks for sharing (I think, altho I'd rather not go back there !)

OldLady Of The Hills said...

Not being on Facebook, I was unaware that you were going to go through this no-fun-at-all Procedure.

I hope it all turns out well, my dear Judy....And I appreciate your describing what happens. If I ever have to have anything like that, I will remember your words, my dear....

LL Cool Joe said...

I couldn't read your post sorry, but I'm glad you are still alive to write down what happened!

Arkansas Patti said...

Well you certainly made that seem painless. If I ever hear those initials from a doc now I won't be apprehensive.
Hoping this test brings nothing but good news. Please let us know and take good care.

kenju said...

There is no residual sore throat, but there is a wee bit of upper chest discomfort that seems to be in my esophagus. Perfectly normal for that to happen, and I only notice it when I turn over in bed.

Nancy said...

I am happy that the testing is finished, that it wasn't TOO bad, and the results were what you wanted to hear.

Your account of the procedure was very good and I'm glad that you did so well.

amarkonmywall said...

Good deal! I'm glad this is turning out to be not so serious. Try to use "globby" in one of our games...

Granny Annie said...

I am amazed at how quickly they took care of you after your arrival at the hospital and how soon your were dismissed. Most tests like that are scheduled to go that quickly but few actually do.

Pat said...

Well done Judy!
I hope I would be as brave and also that our medical staff would be so skilful as to give you no discomfort.
Hoping for total reassurance.xoxox