Monday, August 07, 2017

We're Getting All Cultured Up in Here!!

Two of my neighbors and I went to a play this last weekend; The Women, written by Clare Boothe Luce, whom you may know as a former ambassador to Italy, the first woman appointed to represent the USA in a major country. 

The play was written in the 1930's and the original movie, starring Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell came out in 1939. There was a remake in 2008, starring Meg Ryan and Annette Bening, along with Eva Mendes.  

The play is funny, and shows the author to be erudite and observant.  I think the content is timeless and this play could be adapted for performance in nearly any time period.  The three of us certainly enjoyed it!

However, there was one aspect we didn't enjoy - and that was the cold temperature of the theater. We had been warned by a previous attendee that it was chilly, and so we dressed accordingly - or so we thought. I had on a sweater set and a skirt, and my legs and feet were shivering.

The play was held at The Cary Arts Center, which was the original Cary High School, and as it is on the historic register, it is an interesting place to visit. I just wish it had been warmer. 

4 comments:

sage said...

Well, I'd say better cold than warm. I've been in warm theaters and had to fight to stay awake. I don't remember the movie.

joared said...

Glad you were able to get out and enjoy the play, given what I read about your pinched nerve. Do hope you've gotten some relief for it. That would be a good play to see.

Granny Annie said...

Sounds like a good play. I wouldn't have minded the cold. I've got enough blubber to hibernate.

Pat said...

It's unforgiveable to sabotage the play by not heating the theatre sufficiently. The actors should sue. If I remember correctly CBL suffered from a serious illness and thought she had been poisoned. She had. The ancient ceiling in her Italian bedroom had been shedding arsenic dust onto her shreddies.
Just my sort of play/film but I can't remember it. A common occurrence these days.