Thursday, November 10, 2005

Collections: Ephemera ~ Paper Fans



This fan shows an obvious art deco influence, and possibly dates from the 20's. It is another "self" handled fan, older than those with applied handles. Sadly, this one does not credit the artist. It is simply titled No. 229 - Mother's Delight. I love the look on the baby's face as she beholds her image. Looks like the baby is delighted too. The reverse advertises Dauby's Department Store in Tell City, Indiana. Tell City is in southern Indiana, on the Ohio River. I wonder if Dauby's still exists? A Google search shows several listings for Dauby's, but does not mention if the store is in operation. Maybe one of you will know.

The only shoe brand I recognize is Poll-Parrot Shoes for Boys and Girls. They were being sold when I was a child. I probably wore some of them, but the brand I remember most is Buster Brown. Buster Brown was a cartoon, and eventually became a radio show on Saturdays. There was a character named "Froggy" and Buster was always saying "Pluck your magic twanger, Froggy", and they would instantly go off into another world, or something, I cannot remember exactly what the magic twanger did. Do you remember, Hoss? I do know I always wanted a magic twanger - and still do!

You can read about Buster Brown here:
and hear a recording of the phrase here:

11 comments:

OldOldLady Of The Hills said...

This fan is absolutely gorgeous! Oh, Judy, I feel a new addiction coming over me...FANS! (No, stop me before I begin!!!..lol!)
Truly, I can really see how one can get into collecting fans, just from the few you have put on your blog. This one is particulary beautiful. I love the shape, too.

As for Buster Brown..it's funny, I know I never wore any that I can remember..maybe my siblings did. But I do remember the name very well. Fascinating.

Weary Hag said...

I have worn many a Buster Brown shoe! In fact, one of my friends in early grade school was the daughter of a man who owned a shop solely (no pun intended but it works GREAT) dedicated to Buster Brown shoes.

That fan is beautiful.

Zee said...

Buster Brown! I love my BB shoes! :)

srp said...

I remember both the Poll Parrot and Buster Brown. Mom always made me wear the saddle oxfords to school. They made a comeback when Nyssa was little but never quite completely returned. The athletic shoes had taken over. Of course when we were little and talked of tennis shoes or sneakers we referred to Keds.

Love the fan.

lucylocket said...

I remember wearing Buster Brown's lace-up oxfords. Ugly but they lasted until I outgrew them. The best thing was that accompanying every pair of shoes was a copper colored ring with Buster and his dog that turned my finger a brilliant green. Hated the shoes, loved the ring.

brendalove@gmail.com said...

I can remember wearing Buster Brown underwear too.

vicki said...

Judy- I'm sure Hoss already has a magic twanger. I remember Buster Browns! Back then no self-respecting parent-even the poorest of the poor- would put anything but orthopedically correct hard soled shoes on their child starting at 9 or 10 months. So...
When I was 5 and my brother 7 and my sister a baby, my mother decided to teach herself to drive- because my father refused to teach her. So everyday, after my sister's nap she would pile us in this old humpy Buick and swerve up and down Woodward Avenue by Eight Mile. As you noted in your meme- no one wore seat belts or even used baby seats- we were just all three thrown in the back while my mother swore and taught herself to drive.

There was a hole in the rear floorboard of this old car and one afternoon my brother took off one of my baby sister's first Buster Brown shoes and pushed it through the hole in the floor. I was dumbfounded as we watched it disappear through the rear window. Then we started to smile...and off went the next one. And then her socks. And then one of my shoes. My sock. Bruce's shoe. Bruce's cap...
When my mom pulled into the driveway my father was home early, glaring, hands on hips. And then he roared,"And you're in such a rush to learn to drive that you can't even be bothered putting on the children's shoes!" We spent two hours cruising Woodward and they only found one of the baby's shoes. At a time when shoes were a very valuable commodity. :-)
I've really enjoyed catching up over here- you have SUCH great visuals!

Jamie Dawn said...

I wanna just hug that baby girl. How cute she is!

Pirate said...

Those are pretty cool.

OldHorsetailSnake said...

Seems to me Buster Brown didn't last very long in my town. I always had hand me downs at that age, but do I reemember Buster had a dog named Brownie? Maybe.

sass49 said...

I just came across your post and believe I may be able to offer a little bit of history. My great-grandfather, grandfather and great-uncle established, owned and operated the Dauby Department store. Dauby's Store was a long-standing icon in Tell City, Indiana which unfortunately closed it's doors in the early 1990's I believe. I don't have the exact year available right now, but will post when I locate it.
The hardware portion of the department store remained open after the rest of the store closed. This was owned by my uncle and aunt who continued it's operation until their retirement, at which time they sold the name (Dauby's True Value Hardware) and business.
I also remember Buster Brown and Poll-Parrot shoes. In fact, it was my uncle who operated the shoe department ... an absolutely wonderful man. If I remember correctly the Buster Browns were what we called "Girl Scout" shoes. My mother always insisted that they were good for my feet, but I disliked them (intensely) as they were "clunky and ugly" ask we used to say.
I worked at the department store in the mid-60's as a part-time job when I was in high school. I worked primarily in ladies and childrens clothing and fabrics & notions, but floated in various departments including the office wherever they needed me. It was a good experience at that age and I have many wonderful memories of my family members as well as the other ladies that I worked with during those short years.